Wednesday, 3 June 2009

It was much cooler today, and so more comfortable for an afternoon walk. I spent a couple of hours walking through the tree nursery, wet woods and lakeside scrub area, trying to find some of the more likely species to join the monthly list. The first to do so, was PHEASANT, I flushed up a pair in the tree nursery, this was quickly followed by a JAY, that flew through the wet woods.

At the lake, just CANADA GOOSE was on the water, and there was not much birdsong coming from the scrub area, I checked it out anyway, and was pleased to hear the CUCKOO call from close by, but I didn't see it. BULLFINCH was next for the monthly tally, when at least 4 were seen, and more heard, however the species I was really after only showed itself after quite some searching - the GARDEN WARBLER, it sang loud and clear eventually, and gave me a good view as well. Whilst sitting and listening, I saw a small movement in an Elder tree, some 20 yards away, I couldn't make out what it was, even with my bins. I crept up to the bush and found it to be a Bank Vole, munching on the flower heads!

Quite a productive afternoon in all, with 5 more new species for the month - 54 now, thats 13 behind the record May total, thats gonna take some beating I feel !

Back in the Garden Ive noticed the sunflower hearts are disappearing at some rate! A quick sit and watch showed why, Tits and Finch's are bringing in their fledged young (the first Juv. GOLDFINCH was seen today) hoards of the hungry blighters! Also the NUTHATCH'S are back after a months absence, and the GREAT SPOTTED WOODPECKERS are more regular now. 50kg of hearts are now lasting less than two months!

Below is the Bank vole that was on the Elder.



This photo is of a fungi, I think it's called a stinkhorn. When I was taking the photo I couldn't help thinking of Greenie for some reason!



11 comments:

Greenie said...

Warren ,
It was probably the smell that reminded you of me , as the Stinkhorn-Phallus impudicus ( I know you like the Latin version )has slime covering the bell shaped head , that smells of rotting flesh . This attracts flies , and the spoes contained in the slime is carried on the fly's legs , and dispersed .
The fungus emerges from an egg sack in the ground , and is edible at this stage , and said to be an aphrodisiac , although I haven't tried it .
Brilliant shots of the Bank Vole .

Steve said...

Brilliant shots of the Bank Vole - so jealous!

Ken Browne. said...

Hi Warren. Great photo's of the Bank Vole.

The Early Birder said...

Superbly captured Bank Vole. Well done Warren.

swatson said...

what a lovely shot of the bank vole
nicer than the stinkhorn thingy
Sheila

Phil and Mandy said...

Well Warren, what can I say that has not already been said?
Phil

Kelly said...

Oh my goodness, that little Bank Vole is as cute as can be! I just love it. He looks like he could easily be a character in a children's book..... It would be fun to study him. I'm sure a story would pop right out.

ShySongbird said...

What beautiful photos of the Bank Vole, absolutely delightful!

Loved the Goldfinches on your last post also, I am getting through sackfuls of Sunflower hearts (I now use the kibbled ones as there is less waste) the Goldfinches and Greenfinches are constantly vying for the perches!

Monika said...

I have to echo the comments on the bank vole. Whenever I've seen voles they've been running around, so great job getting it to sit still for some excellent photos! It looks kind of similar to my new pet chinchilla...

Abe Lincoln said...

This is a nice post. I liked the animals.

You might like to read the story about us almost moving to Alaska...

Homesteading in Alaska

fishing guy said...

Warren: Really neat photos, Greenie and his reminder was really neat.